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Infinite Variations, Finite Universe

Posted January 10th, 2017 in blog, marketing, thoughts by Gary

A piano has seven full notes and five half notes. That feels like a relatively small number. The instrument, however, has been used to produce – and continues to produce – countless pieces that are different from one another. The Goldberg Variations, Erik Satie, Bruce Hornsby, all come from that same finite number of keys and represent different levels of success depending on your taste.

So it is with marketing.

The number of actual tools at our disposal are as finite as the interests and incentives of our fellow human beings. Is your campaign focused on branding? Are you offering a BOGO deal? A \discount? A raffle? Points? The question is not whether your offer or idea is new, it is whether it is compelling. And, of course, properly executed.

To prove this point, I present the Guinguette, or turn-of-the-century French dance hall. We are all familiar with the music, the accordion, the cheesy frenchiness of it all, images of Maurice Chevalier or Edith Piaf come to mind. These dance halls have their origin more than a century earlier, when the white wine made from the guinguet grape became popular. In order to increase sales, the local wine-producers in the Nogent-sur-Marne area outside of Paris, where the grapes were cultivated, created popular dances and balls to attract people to the region to… drink.

My point is not that this is special. It is not. The execution of these efforts, however, has created an indelible image of a specific time and place because it was done well. Another great example is the loyalty card, most ingeniously employed by the Catholic Church. If you  attend mass and follow the rules, you will receive the ultimate loyalty prize: Heaven and an eternity relaxing with friends and relatives who all decided to be a part of the same club. But I digress, and fear to offend.

Marshall McLuhan’s famous statement – the Medium is the message – reinforces this notion of a finite universe that requires the need for inventiveness and execution.

Put in a simple way, we can all use a piano to make noise. All you have to do is hit the keys and sounds are produced. But to make music – truly beautiful and memorable music – takes skill.

And with the number of ways to reach people today – print, radio, television, outdoor advertising, social media in its ever increasing complexity – that skill is more and more in demand.

The real question is: Who has it?

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